Porirua City's Long-term Plan 2024–34

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Welcome to our online hub. Here you can read the latest Long-term Plan (LTP) news and share your thoughts, so that we can work together to ensure our city is a great place to live, work and raise a family – now and in the future.

We consulted on our draft LTP with public drop in sessions between 26 March and 26 April 2024 and consultation is now closed.

You can find the draft LTP and other key and supporting info in the Important Documents section on this page or follow the links below.

Read the LTP consultation document: 2024-34 LTP consultation document

Read a summary of our key proposal: Kerbside recycling and rubbish proposal

Welcome to our online hub. Here you can read the latest Long-term Plan (LTP) news and share your thoughts, so that we can work together to ensure our city is a great place to live, work and raise a family – now and in the future.

We consulted on our draft LTP with public drop in sessions between 26 March and 26 April 2024 and consultation is now closed.

You can find the draft LTP and other key and supporting info in the Important Documents section on this page or follow the links below.

Read the LTP consultation document: 2024-34 LTP consultation document

Read a summary of our key proposal: Kerbside recycling and rubbish proposal

What is a Long-term Plan?

Our Long-term Plan (LTP) outlines to our community how we intend to invest for the next 10+ years. Any year there is not a Long-term Plan review and we have significant projects that require public feedback, we will develop an Annual Plan.

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  • Share Hi re pg 23 of the LTP refers to saving $27 mill by not proceeding with the "Taupo Wetlands Upgrade" Flood reduction projects including Karehana Bay and "Taupō Wetlands upgrades". Can you please explain what was intended with this work? on Facebook Share Hi re pg 23 of the LTP refers to saving $27 mill by not proceeding with the "Taupo Wetlands Upgrade" Flood reduction projects including Karehana Bay and "Taupō Wetlands upgrades". Can you please explain what was intended with this work? on Twitter Share Hi re pg 23 of the LTP refers to saving $27 mill by not proceeding with the "Taupo Wetlands Upgrade" Flood reduction projects including Karehana Bay and "Taupō Wetlands upgrades". Can you please explain what was intended with this work? on Linkedin Email Hi re pg 23 of the LTP refers to saving $27 mill by not proceeding with the "Taupo Wetlands Upgrade" Flood reduction projects including Karehana Bay and "Taupō Wetlands upgrades". Can you please explain what was intended with this work? link

    Hi re pg 23 of the LTP refers to saving $27 mill by not proceeding with the "Taupo Wetlands Upgrade" Flood reduction projects including Karehana Bay and "Taupō Wetlands upgrades". Can you please explain what was intended with this work?

    Bill McAulay asked 25 days ago

    Kia ora Bill, 

    Thanks for your question. 

    The Taupō Wetlands upgrades project refers to the flood recovery preliminary design work undertaken for the James St, Plimmerton Roundabout (SH59) area of Plimmerton. This was a sub-project associated with the wider Plimmerton Flood Response Project. The preliminary design works indicated three packages of work for northern, eastern and western parts of James St (and its catchments). Each package of work had a range of proposed solutions depending on each site. More information about the detail can be found on Councils website here -  DRAFT Recommendations - Karehana and Taupo/James St Stormwater Catchment

  • Share If Porirua city has a population of say close to 60,000 and our sewage treatment station was built to serve a population of up to 80,000 before the clarifier and treatment pond requires duplication say decided back in 1989 when it opened. I understand that it is now currently serving a population of close to 1200,000, so the extra 60,000 belong to Wellington City council, linden, tawa, churton park, Glenside. Technically Wellington City council should be paying for the construction of this and not the residents of an already cash strapped Porirua city council. on Facebook Share If Porirua city has a population of say close to 60,000 and our sewage treatment station was built to serve a population of up to 80,000 before the clarifier and treatment pond requires duplication say decided back in 1989 when it opened. I understand that it is now currently serving a population of close to 1200,000, so the extra 60,000 belong to Wellington City council, linden, tawa, churton park, Glenside. Technically Wellington City council should be paying for the construction of this and not the residents of an already cash strapped Porirua city council. on Twitter Share If Porirua city has a population of say close to 60,000 and our sewage treatment station was built to serve a population of up to 80,000 before the clarifier and treatment pond requires duplication say decided back in 1989 when it opened. I understand that it is now currently serving a population of close to 1200,000, so the extra 60,000 belong to Wellington City council, linden, tawa, churton park, Glenside. Technically Wellington City council should be paying for the construction of this and not the residents of an already cash strapped Porirua city council. on Linkedin Email If Porirua city has a population of say close to 60,000 and our sewage treatment station was built to serve a population of up to 80,000 before the clarifier and treatment pond requires duplication say decided back in 1989 when it opened. I understand that it is now currently serving a population of close to 1200,000, so the extra 60,000 belong to Wellington City council, linden, tawa, churton park, Glenside. Technically Wellington City council should be paying for the construction of this and not the residents of an already cash strapped Porirua city council. link

    If Porirua city has a population of say close to 60,000 and our sewage treatment station was built to serve a population of up to 80,000 before the clarifier and treatment pond requires duplication say decided back in 1989 when it opened. I understand that it is now currently serving a population of close to 1200,000, so the extra 60,000 belong to Wellington City council, linden, tawa, churton park, Glenside. Technically Wellington City council should be paying for the construction of this and not the residents of an already cash strapped Porirua city council.

    Greg Koschak asked about 1 month ago

    Kia ora Greg, 

    Many thanks for your comment. A meter is installed so that we can measure the volume of effluent from Wellington City that is treated at Porirua’s treatment plant. Based on that meter, Porirua City Council recovers the cost of capital investment (and operating costs) through a fee that is invoiced to Wellington City Council. This is overseen by a Joint Commitee comprising representatives from both Districts. You can find the latest finance report in the record of the February meeting. The next meeting is scheduled for 2pm on 28 May 2024.

  • Share Other than the glass recycling bin I did not see any mention of the size of the general waste Wheelie bin proposed. We currently pay privately for a 240L Green waste bin and an 80L General Waste bin. If PCC are proposing a 240L General Waste bin that also takes green waste I would be in favour but if it is only a small general waste bin it makes a big difference to my thoughts on this. on Facebook Share Other than the glass recycling bin I did not see any mention of the size of the general waste Wheelie bin proposed. We currently pay privately for a 240L Green waste bin and an 80L General Waste bin. If PCC are proposing a 240L General Waste bin that also takes green waste I would be in favour but if it is only a small general waste bin it makes a big difference to my thoughts on this. on Twitter Share Other than the glass recycling bin I did not see any mention of the size of the general waste Wheelie bin proposed. We currently pay privately for a 240L Green waste bin and an 80L General Waste bin. If PCC are proposing a 240L General Waste bin that also takes green waste I would be in favour but if it is only a small general waste bin it makes a big difference to my thoughts on this. on Linkedin Email Other than the glass recycling bin I did not see any mention of the size of the general waste Wheelie bin proposed. We currently pay privately for a 240L Green waste bin and an 80L General Waste bin. If PCC are proposing a 240L General Waste bin that also takes green waste I would be in favour but if it is only a small general waste bin it makes a big difference to my thoughts on this. link

    Other than the glass recycling bin I did not see any mention of the size of the general waste Wheelie bin proposed. We currently pay privately for a 240L Green waste bin and an 80L General Waste bin. If PCC are proposing a 240L General Waste bin that also takes green waste I would be in favour but if it is only a small general waste bin it makes a big difference to my thoughts on this.

    Martin_S asked about 1 month ago

    Kia ora Martin_S,

    Thank you for your question. To estimate the cost of the proposed kerbside waste and recycling service described in the draft 2024–2034 Long-term Plan, we used the following bin sizes as a guide. If we move forward with the proposal, we will consult with the public to determine the exact size of the bins and other details such as, collection frequency.

    • 140 litre rubbish bin for general waste
    • 240 litre bin for recycling
    • 140 litre bin for food and green waste
    • 40 litre glass crate
  • Share I'm interested in how much money was put into the previous government's initiatives that are now halted or uncertain, and specifically how much of that investment came from the income collected via rates. Do you have that information broken down to that level of detail? on Facebook Share I'm interested in how much money was put into the previous government's initiatives that are now halted or uncertain, and specifically how much of that investment came from the income collected via rates. Do you have that information broken down to that level of detail? on Twitter Share I'm interested in how much money was put into the previous government's initiatives that are now halted or uncertain, and specifically how much of that investment came from the income collected via rates. Do you have that information broken down to that level of detail? on Linkedin Email I'm interested in how much money was put into the previous government's initiatives that are now halted or uncertain, and specifically how much of that investment came from the income collected via rates. Do you have that information broken down to that level of detail? link

    I'm interested in how much money was put into the previous government's initiatives that are now halted or uncertain, and specifically how much of that investment came from the income collected via rates. Do you have that information broken down to that level of detail?

    Leigh asked about 2 months ago

    Kia ora Leigh, 

    Thanks for your question. Apart from Council staff time working toward the previous government’s policy direction, no specific rates funding was spent. Our Council received significant funding from the previous government toward their three waters reform programme. The current government has now signalled a number of policy changes (Resource Management Act, Significant Natural Areas, three waters reform, housing etc) that again will involve staff time to ensure the Council aligns with the new direction. The main change that will affect rates increases going forward is in three waters reform as councils will now have to fund this activity on our own.

Page last updated: 30 Apr 2024, 07:54 AM